Department of Economics

Past Events

  • “Mass Incarceration and the Quality of American Democracy,” with Glenn C. Loury
    Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Brown University.
    The Brown Legal Studies Seminar (BLSS) is an interdisciplinary colloquium series, featuring cutting-edge research on law and legal institutions, from a wide range of vantage points across the social sciences and humanities. Sessions are open to the entire Brown community, but we particularly welcome faculty and graduate students, from all fields. BLSS is sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Watson Institute for International Studies. Advance reading may be expected (see www.watsoninstitute.org/blss).
    Location: Faculty Club, 1 Magee Street. RSVP to [email protected]
  • Cogut Center Undergraduate Fellowship Search opens

    Location: > No location for this event
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    The Cogut Center for the Humanities announces its Undergraduate Fellowship search for academic year 2010-11.
    Undergraduate Fellowships provide an enhanced context for advanced honors students, including the opportunity for collegial interaction and the benefits of critique from an exciting group of Cogut Center Faculty Fellows, Mellon and International Humanities Postdoctoral Fellows, Graduate Fellows and Distinguished Visiting Fellows. Four Undergraduate Fellowships are awarded annually by the governing board of the Cogut Center for the Humanities. A generous research fund is available with these Fellowships.
    Undergrad Fellows are expected to participate in the Cogut Center’s scheduled Fellows’ Seminars (every Tuesday 11-2) and other center events.
    Rising junior and senior honors students are encouraged to apply.
    Application deadline is March 12, 2010. Successful candidates will be notified by mid-April, 2010.
    For instructions, visit: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Humanities_Center/grants/undergraduatefellows.html
  • Cogut Center Undergraduate Fellowship Search closes

    Location: > No location for this event
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    The Cogut Center for the Humanities announces the close of its Undergraduate Fellowship search for academic year 2010-11.
    Undergraduate Fellowships provide an enhanced context for advanced honors students, including the opportunity for collegial interaction and the benefits of critique from an exciting group of Cogut Center Faculty Fellows, Mellon and International Humanities Postdoctoral Fellows, Graduate Fellows and Distinguished Visiting Fellows. Four Undergraduate Fellowships are awarded annually by the governing board of the Cogut Center for the Humanities. A generous research fund is available with these Fellowships.
    Undergrad Fellows are expected to participate in the Cogut Center’s scheduled Fellows’ Seminars (every Tuesday 11-2) and other center events.
    Rising junior and senior honors students are encouraged to apply.
    Application deadline is March 12, 2010. Successful candidates will be notified by mid-April, 2010.
    For instructions, visit: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Humanities_Center/grants/undergraduatefellows.html
  • Workshop for Graduate Students: Research Careers with International Organizations

    Location: Mencoff Hall Seminar Room
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    Ever think about working outside academia? The PSTC Graduate Committee and Sociology Professional Development Committee invite you to join us for a half-day workshop on research careers with international organizations, featuring both invited speakers and Brown faculty.
    Sponsored by the Population Studies and Training Center, the Graduate Student Council, the Department of Sociology, the Department of Economics, and the Department of Anthropology
  • Brown Degree Days at the Department of Economics

    Location: 70 Waterman Street (Department of Economics)
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    Join your fellow economics students as the Economics Department hosts a Brown Degree Days panel featuring alumni who concentrated in economics, who will speak and answer questions about their experiences in the “real world”.
    The panel will take place in the lounge at 70 Waterman Street.
  • Treasures of the Earth: Need, Greed and a Sustainable Future

    Location: Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
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    Saleem Ali, Adjunct Associate Professor, Watson Institute, Brown University
    Associate Professor of Environmental Planning and Asian Studies, University of Vermont
    Saleem Ali is the author of Mining, the Environment and Indigenous Development Conflicts and more recently, Treasures of the Earth: Need, Greed, and a Sustainable Future, the topic of this seminar. http://yalepress.yale.edu/YupBooks/reviews.asp?isbn=9780300141610 which is a finalist for the “book of the year” award from Foreword magazine in the category for environment: http://www.bookoftheyearawards.com/books/9780300141610/. Scientific American also chose the book as a “notable read” in their January issue and National Geographic has invited me for a plenary presentation in Washington in May.
  • Marine Spatial Planning and the Ocean Policy Task Force

    Location: Urban Environmental Lab, Room 106
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    Sandra Whitehouse, PhD
    Environmental Consultant and Policy Advisor
    Ocean Conservancy
    Dr. Sandra Whitehouse is a longtime environmental advocate and policy advisor who uses her expertise in marine science to help shape environmental initiatives in Rhode Island and on the federal level. She has worked as an environmental consultant for the past decade, providing research, analysis, and advice on environmental policy issues to clients including the Rhode Island General Assembly, the Coastal States Stewardship Foundation and the Ocean Conservancy.Dr. Whitehouse is a former chair of Rhode Island’s Coastal Resources Management Council and has served on the boards of Save the Bay, the Nature Conservancy’s Rhode Island chapter, the Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting, The Aquidneck Island Land Trust, Grow Smart Rhode Island, and the University of Rhode Island’s Marine Advisory Council, among others.
    Pizza served for $1.00/slice
  • Ecologists and social scientists both use the concept of community in reference to relationships between actors and elements and how these relationships produce and respond to change. As a social scientist much of my work has focused on human communities directly dependent upon natural resources. My doctoral work focused on how different ecological adaptations affected the organization of human communities among rural Malays of Malaysia. One of these adaptations was fishing, and I became fascinated by the complexity of issues involved in capture fisheries (property rights over biologically renewable resources affected by changing technologies and marketing opportunities driven by national governments and international agencies). This initial work led to prolonged involvement with marine fisheries and coastal aquaculture, first with the International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management (now mercifully if perhaps pretentiously known as the World Fish Center), then with the Marine Policy Center at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and since 1985 at Auburn University. Along the way I have been engaged as a consultant with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, and others. In recent years I have branched out to include work on industrial and small-scale forestry and the rural development potentials of bioenergy derived from cellulosic feedstocks. During 2006-2010 I served on the Science Board of the Louisiana Coastal Assessment project involving federal and state agencies engaged in coastal restoration work. I currently serve on the Science Advisory Committee of the World Fish Center.
  • The Environment and Where it is Going in Terms of Technology and Careers

    Location: Urban Environmental Lab, Room 106
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    In 1993, Terry founded the Santa Monica BayKeeper and served as the Executive Director of the Environment Now Foundation in Santa Monica, CA, where he co-founded the Frank G. Wells Environmental Law Clinic at the School of Law, University of California Los Angeles. He was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2003 as the Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency and later as Cabinet Secretary, the Chief Policy Advisor to the Governor.
    In April, 2007, he was named the Cullman Senior Fellow and Director of the Climate Policy Program of The New America Foundation. In September, 2007, he was appointed as an Operating Advisor to Pegasus Capital Advisors and became a partner in the Pegasus Sustainable Century Merchant Bank in April, 2009. Terry has also serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Center of Climate Strategies since February, 2009.
    Through these institutions, Terry provides advice on climate, energy, and sustainability policy to the Obama Administration, several U.S. Governors, Canadian Premiers, Walmart, Netjets, iGPS, and other global leaders, helping them to build a sustainable environment and economy for generations to come. Terry is a published author who currently lectures and consults a variety of clients on climate and energy policy.
  • Climate Sensitivity and Feedbacks

    Location: Barus & Holley, Room 190
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    “Climate Sensitivity and Feedbacks” is the first in a series of climate modeling seminars organized by faculty in Physics, Applied Math, and Geological Sciences. Prof. Paul Kushner of the University of Toronto, National Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and an author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports will speak from 2:30 to 3:30 pm on Wednesday, September 8 in Barus and Holley, Room 190.
  • Dealing with the worst: Emerging lessons on adapting to climate change

    Location: MacMillan Hall, Room 115
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    Considered one of the world’s top experts on adaptation to climate change, Saleem Huq has expertise on links between climate change and sustainable development, and particularly the perspective of developing countries. He has worked in Africa and South Asia, especially the least developed countries in those two regions. He is currently building negotiating capacity and supporting the engagement of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in UNFCCC ahead of COP15 including negotiator training workshops for LDCs, policy briefings and support for the Adaptation Fund Board. He conducts research into vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the least developed countries. He is the lead author of the chapter on Adaptation and Sustainable Development in the third assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and lead author of the chapter on Adaptation and Mitigation in the IPCC’s fourth assessment report. Before IIED, he was xecutive Director of Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies
  • A Better World by Design 2010

    Location: > Location to be determined
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    A Better World By Design is a three-day internationally acclaimed conference that will impel you to make change locally and globally. On October 1-3, 2010 over 500 guests from around the world will gather on the campuses of Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design to discuss innovative approaches and solutions to extreme poverty, environmental degradation, and societal design. Design magazine Core 77 says the 2009 conference was “incredibly inspiring,” and the Better World team assures you that this year’s conference will reach even greater heights. We look forward to seeing you in October!
  • Economics Industry Panel

    Location: Wilson Hall, Room 101
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    Katharine White, the President and Founder of Lighthouse Performance Strategies, Inc. and of Workplace Renaissance, Inc., and the Brown Women in Business Advisory Board Chair will be moderating a panel discussion about career options after graduation for students interested or concentrating in Economics.
  • Interested in environmental research and practice? Meet the Brown Environmental Fellows

    Location: Urban Environmental Lab, Room 106
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    Join Prof. Heather Leslie and several of the 2010-2011 Fellows on Thursday, November 11 at 12 pm in UEL 106 for a discussion about the Brown Environmental Fellows Program.Juniors interested in all facets of environmental research are encouraged to attend the session, and to apply in February 2011. For more information about the program, see http://www.brown.edu/Research/ECI/activities/bef.html
    Brown Environmental Fellows is a different kind of research experience, introducing undergraduate environmental scientists to the dynamic interface between environmental science, policy, and practice.
    Student-faculty-practitioner teams develop research projects to meet shared objectives – directing scientific discovery into channels that will inform current and future management choices.
  • 2010 Symposium “Economics in the Real World: Healthcare and its Reform”

    Location: Salomon Center, Room 001
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    Department of Economics presents 2010 Symposium “Economics in the Real World: Healthcare and its Reform”.
    Jonathan Gruber (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Bernard I. Fain Lecture:
    “Health Reform In the U.S.: What Happened and What Happens Now?”
    Friday, 5:30 pm
    Jonathan Gruber is a Professor of Economics at MIT. He is also the Director of the Health Care Program at the
    National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics, and an Associate
    Editor of the Journal of Health Economics. He has received numerous awards, including the First award from the
    National Institute on Aging, a Presidential Faculty Fellowship from the NSF, and being the inaugural recipient of
    the American Society of Health Economists Medal.
    Mark Duggan (University of Maryland)
    “How Did We Thread the Needle on Health Care Reform?
    The Role of Economic Policy, Political Factors, and Luck”
    Saturday, 9:00 am
    Mark Duggan is a Professor of Economics at the University of Maryland. His primary fields of interest are public
    finance and health economics. He recently received the American Society for Health Economists Medal for the
    best health economist under 40, and finished a term at the Council of Economic Advisors of the Obama
    administration.
    Mark Pauly (Wharton School)
    “Murphy’s Law and the Implementation of Health Reform”
    Saturday, 9:45 am

    Mark Pauly is a Professor, Vice Dean, and Chair of the Health Care Systems Department in the Wharton School
    at the University of Pennsylvania. He teaches courses on health care, public policy and management, insurance
    and risk management, and economics. He has also consulted for a number of organizations including
    the Greater New York Hospital Association, the Urban Institute, and various pharmaceutical companies.
    Amitabh Chandra (Harvard)
    “Cost Growth in Healthcare”
    Saturday, 11:00 am
    Amitabh Chandra is a Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is a Research Fellow at the
    IZA Institute in Bonn, Germany, and at the NBER. His research focuses on productivity, cost-growth and racial
    disparities in healthcare.
    Vincent Mor (Brown)
    “Will Hospitals, Physician Groups and other health care providers really collaborate under
    Health Care Reform?”
    Saturday, 11:45 am
    Vincent Mor is the Florence Pirce Grant Professor of Community Health in the Public Health Program of the
    Brown University School of Medicine. He was one of the founders of this graduate program and directed the
    Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research.
    Closing Discussion Panel: Saturday, 2:00-4:00 pm,
    with the participation of the morning speakers joined by the following Brown Faculty:
    Anna Aizer (Economics, Public Policy and PSTC)
    Mary Fennell (Sociology, Community Health and Center on Gerontology and Health Care Research)
    Andrew Foster (Economics, Community Health and PSTC)
    Omar Galárraga (Community Health and PSTC)
  • Regional Responses to Energy Supply and Climate Change Challenges

    Location: > Location to be determined
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    Dr. Matthias Ruth holds the Roy F. Weston Chair in Natural Economics at the School of Public Policy, University of Maryland where he is the Director of the Environmental Policy Program, Co-Director of the Engineering and Public Policy Program, and Professor of Environmental Economics and Policy. His research focuses on dynamic modeling of non-renewable and renewable resource use, industrial and infrastructure systems analysis, and environmental economics and policy. He teaches nationally and internationally courses and seminars on microeconomics and policy analysis, ecological economics, industrial ecology and dynamic modeling at the undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. levels, and on occasion conducts short courses for decision makers in industry and policy.
  • Hanquin Tian, Auburn University, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences
    Dr. Tian is an ecosystem scientist and systems modeler who has worked at a broad scale and examined ecosystem processes and exchanges (energy, carbon, nitrogen and water) that occur at the interfaces of the atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere. He has become increasingly interested in coupled biogeochemical cycles in the Earth’s ecosystems and dynamics of coupled natural and human systems. Dr. Tian’s work has been published in prestigious journals, including NATURE and SCIENCE, and featured in various media including newspapers (e.g. Boston Global, Washington Post, New York Times), TV programs (e.g. ABC, CNN) and radio (e.g. BBC-London), and included in the Assessment Reports of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change for the United States of America. Dr. Tian was among the early scientists who documented how ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) affects tropical ecosystem dynamics and the global carbon cycle.
    https://fp.auburn.edu/sfws/tian/
  • The Science-Policy Interface in Climate Adaptation

    Location: List Art Building, Room 120
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    Amanda Lynch, Professor of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Monash University
    A striking aspect of anticipated global climate change in response to the increase of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is the potential for rapid change (climate “surprises”) and increased frequency of extreme events. This potential is supported by paleoclimatic reconstructions and climate models; observational evidence is becoming apparent in the higher latitudes. One theme that has clearly emerged from these studies is that climate is a complex agent of change.
    In many studies of the impacts of climate, the goal is to project climatic, hydrological and ecological changes in the region of interest under the influence of these global climate variations.
    In particular, the frequency and magnitude of extreme events are critical because they shift dynamic social, economic, and biological systems from one state to another. Such a goal is commonly achieved by integrating, under a projected new atmospheric composition, a complex climate system model of the globe. It is generally desirable to use the highest resolution and most sophisticated representations possible. Largely in response to the potential for extremes, and the fact that climate information on regional scales is most appropriate for impact assessment and policy making, development of regional climate models has become an important focus. Regional climate models generally adopt a resolution at least a factor of three higher than the global climate models that drive them, and can be reasonably said to improve upon global models in spatial and temporal variability, and especially tail behavior (extremes).
    Reducing uncertainty in climate “prediction” (the generation of plausible scenarios) is but one aspect of this problem. Further attention must be brought to bear on research into the causes, patterns, and likelihood of these climate change with a specific view to help reduce vulnerabilities and increase our adaptive capabilities.
    http://arts.monash.edu.au/ges/staff/alynch.php